Hiram E. Leonard Diary, March 31 – 6, 1864

“31st Thursday rather fine weather but some cloudy. I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed at 9 ½ lonesome & nearly sick.
“April 1st Friday rather a fine day but cool. I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ nearly sick & lonesome–long to be remembered by me.
“2nd Saturday rather fine weather & some a sewing ______ grain, I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 9 & soon went to bed sick a lonesome day & night to me, & long to be remembered. Geo Potter got home from Chicago at noon.

“3rd Sunday rather a fine forenoon but some cloudy more cloudy & cool in the afternoon & evening. I did my choars choared round & whealed away some of the banking to my house till between 10 & 11 then went to the office for Emmerson, come back by Hoyts whealed more away till noon came in write some etc till one eat a bight & then whealed some hay oughts in to the orchard etc did my choars eat supper went to the office & made up the maile came home by Hoyts about 8 washed me & went to bed about 9, nearly sick, homesick & lonesome & down spirited [in margin] I Kenyon taken sick tonight.

“4th Monday A cool damp disagreeable day for April & backward, I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home at 8 ½ & went to bed at 9 ½ lonesome & __________ [in margin] George went to Chicago.

“5th Tuesday cold damp disagreeable backward weather. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ tiard & lonesome & nearly sick of home.

“6th Wednesday wet backward weather for April. I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ tiard, lonesome & nearly sick.”

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Fashion Friday featuring the Well-Dressed Women of Warrenville

It’s Fashion Friday again at the Historical Society! Enjoy these Well-Dressed Women of Warrenville from local artist Mildred Baldwin’s popular column from the Warrenville Digests.  If you’d like to learn more about Mildred, see our earlier blog post here https://warrenvillehistorical.wordpress.com/2013/03/15/womens-history-month-mildred-baldwin/.

We hope you all have a wonderful weekend!

WDWW Carol Storoe 3.11WDWW Emma Rice 3.25.1971

Published in: on March 28, 2014 at 8:21 am  Leave a Comment  

Hiram E. Leonard Diary, March 24 – 30, 1864

24th Thursday  cold backward weather or March. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ went to bed 9 ½ lonely & sick. Geo O Potter went to Chicago to see about getting my eye doctor, got back about 2 oclock tomorrow morning.

25th Friday  cold raw weather for March. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home at 8 ½ & went to bed at 9 ½ lonesome homesick & nearly sick.

26th Saturday  Cold weather for the season & the ground frozen yet, I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came about 8 ½ & went to bed lonesome & sick.

27th Sunday  cold backward weather for March. I did my choars was at home till about 11 then went to Cals & Sherman Willsons & in to my timber came back & stayed till near 5 came home & went to bed after going to the office & making up the maile, about 9 oclock lonesome & homesick no place seemed like home. I Kenyon came down & carried George & Elizabeth up to his house about 9 ½ came back about 6.

28th Monday  a rainey damp disagreeable day & night. I did my choars was at the office all day & night came home at about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ lonesome & nearly sick.

29th Tuesday  rather a damp muddy disagreeable day. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ tiard lonesome & nearly sick & slep but little—George Potter went to Chicago to get his eyes doctered.

30th Wednesday  rather more fine but cool. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed 9 ½ tiard lonesome & nearly sick.”

Hiram E. Leonard Diary, March 17 – 23, 1864

17th Thursday fine cold tedious weather for March. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ by Hoyts & went to bed at 9 ½ sick lonely [in margin] George went to Griffeths.

18th Friday  cold & some cloudy & rough. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home by Hoyts at 8 ½ & went to bed at 9 ½ lonely & sick.

19th Saturday A rough windy day for March & cold. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ by Hoyts & went to bed about 9 ½ lonesome & sick.

20th Sunday  A fine pleasant day but cool. I did my choars was at home the most of the day a choaring round & visiting called at the office twice & called at Hoyts & in evening came home at 7 ½ wrote some and went to bed about 8 ½ or 9, lonesome & nearly sick. H Gould & family came here & went & got Caroline down here & stayed till about 4 Hant left Car went with Rollen about 5 oclock Roll had a letter from Doc Potter to have him come down there.

21st Monday  rather cold disagreeable weather for March. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ tiared loneseome & nearly sick ground froze yet.

22nd Tuesday  rather cold backwards weather for March. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed lonesome tiard & nearly sick.

23rd Wednesday  rather cool raw weather for the season & the ground frozen I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ lonesome & nearly sick.”

Women’s History Month: Florence Uglow Byerrum

Florence Uglow Byerrum 1885 – 1969

Florence Uglow Byerrum 1885 – 1969

It was Warrenville’s good fortune when Dr. Earl Byerrum was appointed to the post of DuPage County Veterinarian in 1923, which led Earl and his wife, Florence, to purchase of one of the first homes built in the River and Grove Addition on Batavia Road.

A many-faceted, talented woman, Florence Uglow Byerrum – a former dean of women at the Western State College in Colorado – had begun her career in education as an Education and Latin teacher, after earning her B.A. from the University of Colorado where she was presented the Phi Beta Kappa key for outstanding work. She continued her passion for education in Warrenville, teaching music in the public schools from 1926 to 1940.

Almost immediately upon moving to Warrenville, Florence plunged into club work, organizing a federated Woman’s Club and guiding it as its first president starting in 1925. She rose through the district and state ranks of Woman’s Clubs to the state presidency in 1947, while still remaining active in the local group.

Her earlier role as State Conservation Chairman (“Illinois’ First Lady of Conservation”) focused her interest in that direction, and made her an excellent choice for National Chairman of Conservation during the period of 1950 to 1954.

The next year, Illinois Governor William Stratton sought her out for his Legislative Commission, formed to study state park entrance fees and repot to the legislature in 1957 with recommendations. The other eight members, all male, promptly elected her as their chairman.

Five years later, Governor Otto Kerner appointed her to the National History Advisory Committee, a body charged with the study of the resources of Beach State Park, which is located north of Waukegan.

Throughout her years, Florence Byerrum’s gracious commanding presence put her in great demand as a speaker on both parliamentary procedure and conservation.

Hiram E. Leonard Diary, March 10 – 16, 1864

10th Thursday  A cloudy damp muddy day, I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about ____ & went to bed nearly sick. Mrs Potter went to Williamses & stayed all night & helped Williams people in their afflication.

11th Friday rather a cloudy damp misty forenoon more pleasant in afternoon I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home between 8 & 9 & went to bed about 9 ½ sick nearly & had the blues, Mrs Potter got home about 2 oclock from Williamses & found George O Potter here he came in the stage at noon was sick & a most blinded with sore eyes, Samuel Williams was buried in the burying ground this afternoon, Elder Hanna preached the funeral sermon.

12th Saturday A cloudy damp muddy day snowed some during the day & snowed the ground white during the evening & froze, I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home at 8 ½ by Hoyts & went to bed about 9 ½ nearly sick.

13th Sunday A cool & some cloudy morning but rather a pleasant day & thawed, I did my choars was round home a chaoring the most of the day, went to the office near night & came home by Hoyts & went to bed before 9 nearly sick, Beardsley & wife and several others were here to see George & wife, Colered Mary was here.

14th Monday  rather fine cold weather for March & rough. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ nearly sick.

15th Tuesday rather fine cold rough weather, I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ lonely & sick.

16th Wednesday fine cold rough weather. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ by Hoyts & went to bed 9 ½ lonesome.”

Women’s History Month: Dr. Mary Breme

Mary G. Breme was born in Chicago, the fifth of six children of immigrant parents from Slovenia (formerly Yugoslavia). She was their first child to be born in the United States. Mary did her pre-medical education at Lewis University, now the Illinois Institute of Technology, and graduated from the Medical School at the University of Illinois, interning at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. She completed her residency at Geneva Hospital in Geneva, Illinois, and passed up a desirable position in Geneva to practice medicine in Warrenville.

Dr. Mary Breme was before her time, graduating from medical school in 1943 and pursuing a focus on remedying the problem of lack of medical care in rural areas. Dr. Mary opened the Warrenville Medical Clinic in July of 1950, after practicing medicine on the second floor of the bank building in Warrenville on Stafford Place and Batavia Road for six years. One wing of the Clinic housed five combination treatment-consultation rooms-two of which were equipped to handle minor surgery.  The second wing offered complete facilities for diagnosis and treatment as X-ray, ultraviolet radiation, electrocardiography, diathermy, basal metabolism and clinical laboratory. Dr. Mary’s practice flourished.

Dr Mary Breme

In 1964 Dr. Mary continued her medical education at the Menninger School of Psychiatry in Topeka, Kansas. She returned to Warrenville in 1967 to set up her practice in psychiatry. Quoting the Warrenville News from March 13, 1958, “Dr. Mary was finally able to build the Warrenville Clinic completed in 1950. The Clinic stands as a monument to a doctor’s tireless care for her patients and to Warrenville’s response to that care.” This Clinic is now home to Warrenville Youth and Family Services.

For many years Dr. Mary resided on an estate on Winfield Road.  Being a very practical woman, she purchased the property because of her dream to treat emotionally disturbed children.  Although circumstances prevented her dream from ever becoming a reality, the home was a quiet retreat for a very busy lady and a wonderful opportunity for her daughter, Mary Ellen, to nurture her love of horses and sheep.

Dr. Mary once said, “It has been my experience that there are four areas of growth – physical, mental, emotion and spiritual.  For many years the physical and mental were emphasized, then came the recognition of the importance of solving emotional needs, but it seems that people are beginning to recognize that the most important of the four areas has been neglected.”

Dr. Mary,  is affectionately remembered by many local residents and literally contributed to the growth of our community, delivering many Warrenville babies during her time in town.  Two photo albums at the City Museum are filled with pictures of these children.  Please stop by and add you or any of your family members to these wonderful pieces of history, a true testament to the difference Dr. Mary made on our community.

Published in: on March 6, 2014 at 8:38 am  Comments (1)  

Hiram E. Leonard Diary, March 3 – 9, 1864

3rd Thursday  fine weather for March. I did my choars was at the office all day & in evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed 9 ½.

4th Friday  fine weather for the season. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ sick.

5th Saturday  fine weather  I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ nearly sick. Dave & Hat McNelly came here Jerome & family came.

6th Sunday A fine day for the season, I did my choars was at the office twice at home the most of the time a choaring round, was at office & Hoyts in evening came home at 7 ½ & went to bed before 9. H Gould & Noonen called, Frank was here.

7th Monday  fine weather for March but rather muddy. I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 8 ½ by Hoyts & went to bed about 9 nearly sick. Dan Kenyons wife died this morning & Mrs. Potter went up there with M. Ferry & stayed all night.

8th Tuesday  fine warm weather but cloudy & muddy. I did my choars was at the office all day & evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ nearly sick, Mrs Kenyon was buried today at the big Woods & Mrs Potter came home.

9th Wednesday A cloudy damp day & evening. I did my choars was at the office all day & in the evening came home about 8 ½ & went to bed about 9 ½ nearly sick, Samuel Williams died this morning early at home very sudden.”

Warrenville and the American Civil War: March 1864

March 1864 brought more sadness to those in Warrenville when two villagers passed away. On March 7th, Dan Kenyon’s wife, Esther Warner Kenyon died.  The Kenyons were a family of early Warrenville settlers. On the 8th, she was buried at Big Woods Cemetery.

Just one day later, Samuel Williams died suddenly in his family home at the age of 35. Samuel’s father was a War of 1812 veteran who had moved his family of 8 children to Warrenville from New York in 1834. On his way west, Mr. Williams had stopped at Fort Dearborn to secure a loan of $43 which he used to purchase land on what is now known as Williams Road, named for their family farm. Samuel was the third Williams child to die since they had arrived in Warrenville. Community residents rallied around the family and did what they could to help Mrs. Williams through her grief.

The day after Samuel was buried, George Potter returned to Warrenville from his station in the war, suffering from eye problems.  George was married to Hiram Leonard’s former housekeeper’s daughter, Elizabeth.  Hiram had raised Elizabeth and her brother William Wray; George lived with Hiram while he was home on leave, as his wife had been staying with her adopted father in his absence. George’s eye problems continued throughout the month, and became so severe that on March 24th he made a trip into Chicago to see an eye doctor. Many Civil War soldiers were not lucky enough to receive such care, but George, living so near to Chicago, would take return trips into the big city until his eyes healed and he was able to return to the fighting.

Taken from the Warrenville Historical Society’s program “1864 in 48 Minutes” that was held on January 26, 2014.